A Quick History of Jackson NH

Jackson is such a quaint historic town we thought we’d share a quick note about the history from our friends at the historical society.  A great  place for a romantic getaway and an exciting day of hiking, biking, swimming or even shopping, Jackson NH is a great town to visit, explore or even settle.

The first settlers in our area came from Madbury, New Hampshire and they called their new settlement New Madbury. At the time of incorporation on December 4, 1800, Adams was adopted as the town name in honor of President John Adams. It remained so until 1829, when the name was changed to Jackson.

While the record, official or otherwise, is unclear as to who instigated the name change, it was motivated in response to the election of President Andrew Jackson, the hero of the Battle of New Orleans. The popularity of President Jackson is reflected in that only one vote was cast for keeping Adams as the name.

In the mid-1800′s, Jackson became a popular destination for artists arriving by coach to capture the scenic beauty of the area on their canvases. Others attracted by the what they saw on canvas began to arrive. At first, farmers opened their doors to these visitors, and many expanded their own homes into boarding houses. Hotels were then built to accommodate visitors arriving by train for the summer to enjoy the mountain air, croquet and conversation on the expansive porches.

In 1876, the covered bridge which spans the Ellis River was built by Charles Austin Broughton and his son Frank. At that time it was named the “Honeymoon Bridge”. Local custom has carried on a romantic tradition with many newly married couples having their photograph taken there, thus adding another memory to their special day. Jackson’s Covered Bridge, a Paddleford truss construction, is one of 55 remaining today. It is well maintained by the town and is protected by a fire protection system to alert the local fire station.

World War II brought an end to these glorious summers. Although many of the grand hotels of Jackson are now gone, the splendor of this Village remains. Visitors now come year round to enjoy the views, covered bridge, white steepled church, water falls, mountains, and rolling farmland. They now stay in country inns, B&B’s, lodges, or the only remaining grand hotel and sample local flavor in the restaurants.

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>